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Peanut-free schools: What does it really mean, and are they necessary?

  • David R. Stukus
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: David R. Stukus, MD, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205.
    Affiliations
    Division of Allergy and Immunology, Nationwide Children's Hospital and Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio
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Published:April 25, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2017.03.037
      Approximately 4% to 8% of children in the United States have at least 1 food allergy, including 1% to 2% who are allergic to peanut.
      • Gupta R.S.
      • Springston E.E.
      • Warrier M.R.
      • Smith B.
      • Kumar R.
      • Pongracic J.
      • et al.
      The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United States.
      These rates have increased during the past 2 decades for reasons not fully understood.
      • Sicherer S.H.
      • Sampson H.A.
      Food allergy.
      Current food allergy management entails strict avoidance of the food allergen along with immediate access to self-injectable epinephrine in case of accidental ingestion causing anaphylaxis.

      Key words

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