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Increasing cost of epinephrine autoinjectors

      Epinephrine autoinjectors are necessary for food- and insect venom–induced allergic systemic reactions and other medical conditions in which there is a necessity for immediate access to self-administration of epinephrine. The recently published “ICON: food allergy”
      • Burks A.W.
      • Tang M.
      • Sicherer S.
      • Muraro A.
      • Eigenmann P.A.
      • Ebisawa M.
      • et al.
      ICON: food allergy.
      highlights epinephrine autoinjectors or a 1:1000 solution administered intramuscularly as the first-line outpatient treatment for anaphylaxis. Demand for epinephrine autoinjectors has increased throughout the world as the indications for their use have expanded. Costs have simultaneously increased, resulting in a significant economic burden for some patients and families who require such therapy (Fig 1).
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Fig 1Average wholesale price of epinephrine autoinjectors versus time in constant US dollars. Data on the cost of single-unit equivalent products were obtained from every available manufacturer in the Micromedex Red Book and converted into constant 2011 US dollars.
      • Burks A.W.
      • Tang M.
      • Sicherer S.
      • Muraro A.
      • Eigenmann P.A.
      • Ebisawa M.
      • et al.
      ICON: food allergy.
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      References

        • Burks A.W.
        • Tang M.
        • Sicherer S.
        • Muraro A.
        • Eigenmann P.A.
        • Ebisawa M.
        • et al.
        ICON: food allergy.
        J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012; 129: 906-920
      1. Micromedex 1.0 (Healthcare Series), (electronic version). Greenwood Village (CO): Thomson Reuters (Healthcare). Available at: http://www-thomsonhc-com.ezproxy.hsc.usf.edu. Accessed January 27, 2012.

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      Linked Article

      • ICON: Food allergy
        Journal of Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyVol. 129Issue 4
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          Food allergies can result in life-threatening reactions and diminish quality of life. In the last several decades, the prevalence of food allergies has increased in several regions throughout the world. Although more than 170 foods have been identified as being potentially allergenic, a minority of these foods cause the majority of reactions, and common food allergens vary between geographic regions. Treatment of food allergy involves strict avoidance of the trigger food. Medications manage symptoms of disease, but currently, there is no cure for food allergy.
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